DEVELOPING INDIVIDUALIZED CURRICULUM BASED ON THE IEP

 

Student 1: Moderate to Severe

Student 2: Mild to Moderate

 

Student 1- Moderate to Severe- First, fill out the IEP Form

Where does the information come from?

 

IMPORTANT PROCEDURE:

It is important to make contact with the parents as soon as student is assigned to your room. . This can be done via school conference, letter, telephone call, home visit. During that initial contact, it is important that discussion take place regarding current goals and additional goals that the parent may or may not want to implement. The student will have a greater chance for success if the family and teacher work together as a team to help student achieve the goals. It is important for school and family to set up a communication system between them.

It is also important that the parent be willing to be responsible to help student achieve the goals that have been selected. Be sure and ask parent if they would be willing to help in that responsibility. If they agree, be sure and put them on the IEP Annual Goal and Objectives Form under Person(s) Responsible. It is also important to inform parents and others on the IEP team that you will be teaching the student additional skills from other curriculum areas but these skills were selected for the IEP. Additional goals can be added at the meeting.

 

Student History: From different sections of IEP and interview with parents

Student is an 8 year old Caucasian female who has been diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy, Seizure Disorder, and Mental Retardation. She is also considered to be Orthopedically Impaired. She lives with parents, one brother and one sister. Extended family is supportive to studentís family.

 

 

The information below is part of the IEP, Section B

 

Students Strengths:

Student has a happy disposition and is well liked by peers and other teachers. She loves attending school. Mother reports that student is upset on holidays when the bus doesnít come to pick her up. She is eager to please and loves to be praised for her work. She picks up sign language words quickly. She understands what is said to her and can follow verbal directions. She can identify the letters of the alphabet and can trace several letters. She is now able to catch a ball thrown from 1 foot away.

 

Parent Concerns:

Parent states that her number one goal would be to have her daughter be able to communicate her needs and desires to family, friends and teachers. She would like to be able to take her daughter out to eat and to order a meal. Parents would also like to see their daughter play with the neighbor children.

 

Present Levels of Performance: Areas of need become the areas of accountability and require data collection. Teachers will provide curriculum in both academic and functional needs as appropriate. Goals for the IEP will come from the areas of need.

Communication: Student demonstrates no expressive language and has oral motor problems. Toleration of oral motor exercises has improved. Receptive language is her strength. Communicates needs/desires through gestures and limited sign language. Student is receiving speech therapy twice weekly to address her oral motor deficits.
Area of Need
Self-Care/ Independent Living: Student has difficulty taking care of her personal needs due to Cerebral Palsy. She attempts remove clothing but needs assistance with zipping and buttoning. Student needs assistance with carrying lunch tray, opening milk carton but is able to feed herself. She needs to be constantly reminded to swallow and chew. Due to the oral motor problem, student exhibits severe drooling. Student is toilet trained but needs to be reminded to use the restroom. She needs minimal assistance in completing this task.
Functional Academics: Student is presently working on prewriting skills, counting objects, tracing her first name, writing numbers 1-5. She is learning to use the mouse at the computer and she enjoys simple computer games. She is building up a sign language vocabulary and is learning to sign simple books that have been created for her. She is learning to recognize and sign safety words.
Area of Need
Vocational: Student is able to sort tasks by color, size and shape. She is able assemble simple tasks that involve nuts and bolts. She is able to package simple tasks (example putting knife, fork, spoon and napkin in a bag). Student is able to follow a two direction command. Student works well independently once directions are given. She is able to clean up after herself if given additional time for her to complete the task.
Mobility, Motor Skills: Student's motor skills are delayed due to Cerebral Palsy. Based on testing administered by the Adaptive Physical Education teacher, the student's gross motor skills are at a 3-4 year old level. This includes balance, jumping, catching and eye-hand coordination skills. Although she has a balance problem, student enjoys running out on the playground.
Area of Need
Social, Emotional: Student is well liked by peers and teachers. She is always happy and is willing to share and cooperate with others. She demonstrates good manners and makes good choices. Because she is unable to vocalize, she will get your attention by raising her hand or standing in front of the person she wants to speak to. When engaged in a conversation, she will give direct eye contact and try to communicate through sign or gestures.  
Recreation, Leisure: Student enjoys being with others. She enjoys playing on the playground with the other children. She participates in bowling and is able to pick up a light weight ball and roll it down the aisle. She enjoys playing indoor games with her friends but wants to win all the time. She loves to listen to music.  
Cognitive / Adaptive: N.A.- (A psychologist will determine this area.)  

 

Click below to read "Annual Goals and Benchmarks- Short-term Goals" for this Moderate to Severe Child (from IEP- the areas of need)

Goals for two areas of need

Goals for third area of need

 

PLANNING CURRICULUM (from the areas of need)

In order for this student to accomplish her goals, specific materials need to be created. Many times it is up to the teacher to create their own materials. The following are just a few resources for helping plan curriculum for this particular student. The teacher and parent sat down and decided what sign language words would be meaningful to the student at home and at school. After the words were selected, a sign language book was created for the parents to have at home so they could learn what the student was being taught at school. Those goals not identified as areas of need still need a curriculum but those curricular areas are not included.

Resources for curriculum (areas of need):

 

 

 

Student 2- Mild to Moderate- First, fill out the IEP Form

Where does the information come from?

 

IMPORTANT PROCEDURE:

It is important to make contact with the parents as soon as student is assigned to your room. . This can be done via school conference, letter, telephone call, home visit. During that initial contact, it is important that discussion take place regarding current goals and additional goals that the parent may or may not want to implement. The student will have a greater chance for success if the family and teacher work together as a team to help student achieve the goals. It is important for school and family to set up a communication system between them.

It is also important that the parent be willing to be responsible to help student achieve the goals that have been selected. Be sure and ask parent if they would be willing to help in that responsibility. If they agree, be sure and put them on the IEP Annual Goal and Objectives Form under Person(s) Responsible. It is also important to inform parents and others on the IEP team that you will be teaching the student additional skills from other curriculum areas but these skills were selected for the IEP. Additional goals can be added at the meeting.

 

The information below is part of the IEP, Section B

 

Student History:

Student is a 10 year old Hispanic male who speaks and understands both English and Spanish. He lives with his six sisters and parents. He gives extended eye contact and has expressive facial expressions. He is independent in most areas but has a difficult time concentrating and staying on task. He has been diagnosed with ADHD and is currently taking Ritalin 20 mg in the morning and 10 mg at night. There is a noticeable difference when he doesn't take his medication.

 

Student's Strengths:

Student is very cooperative and dependable. He enjoys school and makes a considerable effort to complete assignments and homework. He is eager to please and enjoys helping his teacher. He is polite and kind and has a lot of friends. His appearance is neat and always clean. he can now read 50 words on the Dolch list and can sound out all letters. he can add and subtract single digit problems using counters. He is a good verbal problem solver, especially in science and is the class "expert" on the computer.

 

Parent Concerns:

Parent is concerned about his low academic performance and his frustration at home while trying to help him do his homework. He gets upset while trying to complete his homework and will start screaming that he is stupid.

 

Present Levels of Performance: Areas of need become the areas of accountability and require data collection. Teachers will provide curriculum in both academic and functional needs as appropriate. Goals for the IEP will come from the areas of need.

Academically, student performs at a 2.0 grade level in the entire core curriculum.

Reading: Student's ability to identify words is severely delayed. He is currently working on identifying words taken from the Dolch list that is at a first grade level. He has difficulty with reading comprehension. He can alphabetize words by the first letter.
Area of Need
Mathematics: Student has difficulty remembering math facts. He can do simple addition and subtraction using counters to help keep him on task. He gets embarrassed and frustrated with his inability to keep up with the class. A more hands on math, Touch Math, is going to be introduced.
Area of Need
Written Expression: Student's greatest area of weakness is spelling, punctuation and grammar skills. It is difficult for him to write and his letters are poorly formed. There is inappropriate spacing between letters. His written expression and description is very simple. Sentences range from 4-6 words.
Area of Need
Other Academic Areas: Student enjoys Science very much. He is interested in the experiments and the hands on approach keeps his attention. He is very good on the computer and will help other students when they need help.
Communication: From observations, it appears that the student demonstrates good expressive and receptive language skills. He maintains good eye contact and has good facial expressions.
Cognitive / Adaptive Skills: N.A. (requires a psychologist)
Behavior (Social/Emotional): Student is well mannered the majority of the time. He gets frustrated when he can't do his work and will push his book and papers to the side. He also gets impatient and doesn't want to wait for his turn.
Area of Need
Prevocational and /or Vocational Skills: Student follows simple directions. He will work at a task independently and will clean up after he has completed the assignment. He enjoys his classroom responsibilities.

 

 

Click below to read "Annual Goals and Benchmarks- Short-term Goals" for this Moderate to Severe Child (from IEP- the areas of need)

Goals 1

Goals 2

Goals 3

 

PLANNING CURRICULUM (from the areas of need)

In order for this student to accomplish his goals, specific materials need to be created. Many times it is up to the teacher to create their own materials. The following are just a few resources for helping plan curriculum for this particular student. The teacher and parent sat down and decided what resources would be meaningful to the student at home and at school. Those goals not identified as areas of need still need a curriculum but those curricular areas are not included.

 

 

 


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